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Colorado’s leading disease experts are celebrating vaccine trials aimed at preventing RSV

Colorado’s leading disease experts are celebrating vaccine trials aimed at preventing RSV

Colorado’s leading disease experts are celebrating the success of Pfizer’s vaccine trials aimed at preventing respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV.

The trial phase is now closing as the company prepares to seek FDA approval. Colorado’s top virus experts support the move and say a vaccine is ready.

dr. Eric Simoes has studied the virus for nearly 40 years and most recently led the Pfizer trials at the University of Colorado School of Medicine where he is a clinical professor.

“We immunized the mothers, it was part of a large study, we had 7,400 children, we had about 100 mothers that we immunized here in Colorado at University Hospital, and we followed the babies,” Simoes continued, “so what we did was we immunized we are mothers before the RSV season so that when the babies are born, they are protected by antibodies from the mother.”

He says that it worked well in the prevention of serious diseases; when given to pregnant women in trials, it was nearly 82% effective in preventing severe RSV in infants up to 3 months of age, and nearly 70% effective in children up to 6 months of age.

Simoes, who is an infectious disease specialist at Children’s Hospital Colorado, calls it a big win for both pediatricians and parents and is confident the vaccine will be approved.

When it does, it will be the first RSV vaccination and the first new product linked to the infection in more than two decades.

So what if the vaccine is too late for you? Simoes says there are other trials underway that have shown success in preventing RSV in babies after birth.

It is recruiting mothers of infants born after January 2022 to participate in a trial using monoclonal antibodies to prevent RSV. He says the results are just as promising as those seen with Pfizer’s vaccine for mothers.

The commitment is for about a year, but Simoes is sure of its effectiveness.

“It’s a very good time for parents if they want their children to be protected,” said Dr. Simoes.

If you are interested in participating in the study, you can find more information here: researchstudies.cuanschutz.edu/



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