Science

See the last total lunar eclipse until 2025 on November 8

See the last total lunar eclipse until 2025 on November 8

You will get one last chance to witness a total lunar eclipse for a long time. NASA noted that the last such eclipse until March 2025 begins in the early morning hours of November 8 in North America. Parts of Asia, Australia, New Zealand and South America can also be seen. The partial eclipse will begin at 4:09 a.m. Eastern, and the total eclipse will last from 4:16 a.m. to 5:42 a.m. ET. The final partial stage will end at 6:49 am. Those on the US East Coast will miss some or all of that last segment as the Moon sets. However, you may not need to go outside if it’s too cold – there are ways to watch from the warmth of your home.

Live streams will be available. Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona will offer multiple telescope views of the total lunar eclipse beginning at 4 a.m. Eastern. Timeanddate.com will have streams in multiple cities, including our own view from Roswell, New Mexico, as well as sources from San Diego and Perth, Australia. The Virtual Telescope Project will too provide international coverage.

You’ll want to take a look even if 2025 doesn’t seem that far away. Total lunar eclipses (where the Earth is directly between the Moon and the Sun) are nicknamed “blood moons” because of optical tricks that turn the surface of the Moon a dramatic red. Where short-wavelength blue light tends to get trapped by particles in Earth’s atmosphere, the longer-wavelength red, orange, and yellow colors help them complete their cosmic journey. It’s a stunning effect that you can see with the naked eye. And if you have a telescope, you might even spot it Uranus in the distance.

In that interval there will be partial and penumbral eclipses of the Moon. The first visible in America will take place on October 28, 2023, and the others on March 25 and September 18 next year. So you’re not completely out of luck, even if those events won’t be all that appealing.

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